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Nokia's 3310 revival – what's NEXT? Vote now

You loved it, they killed it: Now bring it back

By Gavin Clarke, 17 Feb 2017

Nokia didn’t once just dominate the world’s handset market, it defined it.

In an era where hardware mattered and software came second, Nokia produced not just beautiful but solid handsets, its phones owning roughly half the market.

Nokia’s pinnacle: the 8110 – a sleek, high-end banana phone in 1996 employed by the rebels of 1999’s mind-bending, reality challenging sci-fi hit The Matrix but it was the everyday 3310 that owned the mass market.

A phone that was, really, just a phone: no camera, some basic games and SMS texting at a time when messaging was the new alternative to talking on a phone.

All that... and tons of battery life.

It was actually the 3310’s predecessor, the sculpted 3210 that paved the way by Nokia by ditching the external antenna but it was ever-so-slightly top-heavy.

Its 3310 successor was better balanced and pleasing on the eye, a palm nestler that sold in tens of millions and which fans still remember.

I gave up on my 3310 before it failed me: in a changing world, and having received an Android Nexus that made texting a human experience, I got my first smart phone and quietly put the 3310 in a drawer.

In the event of nuclear war, however, I know which of these two phones I could reliably turn to.

Now HMD is said to be reviving the 3310, and in its honour, The Reg presents its shortlist of technologies thought past their sell-by date and due a revival.

Not necessarily the first in their field, these beauties made their mark on history and found favour in our lives by making work easier or more entertaining.

Laughable by today’s touchscreen, full-colour, apps-driven, high-density standards, here’s your chance to vote for the piece of tech that should next be revived. ®

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